Gastrointestinal diseases (abbrev. GI diseases or GI illnesses) refer to diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract, namely the oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine and rectum, and the accessory organs of digestion, the liver, gallbladder, and pancreas. The gastrointestinal tract (also called the GI tract) is a series of hollow organs that form a long continuous passage from our mouth to our anus. The organs that make up our GI tract are our mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and anus.  Our GI tract, together with our liver, pancreas, and gallbladder, make up our digestive system. An extensive network of blood vessels supply blood to these organs and also transport nutrients away to other organs in the body. Nerves and hormones work together to regulate the functioning of the digestive system and bacteria that reside within our GI tract (called our gut flora or microbiome) play a role in digestion, immunity, and our overall health. A membranous sac called the peritoneum holds all the digestive system organs in place.

Stem cells are actively and successfully used to treat gastric diseases.

Metabolic syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is an obesity-based, complicated clinical condition that has become a global epidemic problem with a high associated risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes or glucose dysmetabolism are the major factors constituting metabolic syndrome, and these factors are interrelated and share underlying pathophysiological mechanisms…

Ulcerative Colitis. Crohn’s Disease

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD comprises a group of diseases that affect the gastrointestinal tract. Ulcerative colitis occurs when the lining of your large intestine (also called the colon), rectum, or both become inflamed…